Milamber’s NYC Portfolio Showcase Event

If you invest, are employed, are an entrepreneur, or are simply keenly interested in the worlds of Educational, Media, Music, and Sports technology companies then join us at Milamber’s NYC fall Portfolio Showcase for a very relaxed evening of drinks, nibbles and networking with our people and our Portfolio Companies.

Please confirm your attendance by clicking HERE.

Feel free to forward this invitation to colleagues who may be interested.
Can’t make it but would like to talk about what you do, what we do, and how we might help each other, then please email me at tim@milamber.co.uk.

Tim Moore

Managing Director,Milamber USA

Date and Time 

Thu 20 October 2016 – 17:30 – 20:30

Location 

Caelum Gallery, Room 315 – 3rd Floor, 508/526 W. 26th Street, New York

 

UK and US based, Milamber Ventures plc is a full service venture support firm, operating in the education, media and technology sectors.
We believe in Business Development first, Funding second; developing Investment Ready Companies that are profitable and sustainable.
Today Milamber is helping over 25 Portfolio Companies from Europe and the US.

 

file:///C:/Users/Jessia/Downloads/Milamber’s%20NYC%20Portfolio%20Showcase%20Event%20Invitation.pdf

KNOWLEDGEMOTION PARTNERS WITH SEVEN MORE CONTENT PROVIDERS FOR BOCLIPS.COM

knowledge motion logo

New content partnerships expand the curriculum aligned video library to more than 1.85 million high quality videos available for streaming and download. Makes further moves into corporate learning.

LONDON

Knowledgemotion, the London based company behind the world’s largest library for video in education – boclips.com – has now added seven new video libraries, marking a move into the corporate learning space. The new content partners have also significantly increased the number of specialist subjects available for primary, secondary and tertiary levels (K20-Higher Ed).

These newest content partners include the Art and History licensing specialist Bridgeman Footage and the prestigious Nature Picture Library. New partner ShortCutsTV, offers Sociology and Psychology specifically for education. And for primary level, BulBul and KarisLearn have been added. The latter makes math concepts visible, accessible and usable.

Finally, to add to its collection of corporate learning videos, boclips.com now also offers bespoke videos from Sustainable Business Education and EL Consulting. Their content range addresses a broad range, such as how to have a difficult conversation at work to how to set up your business in a sustainable fashion.

Beatrice Okoro, Account Manager at Bridgeman comments: “High resolution contemporary and fine art works are brought to life by the interactive IkonoTV collection, exclusively represented by Bridgeman Footage. Through our cooperation with Knowledgemotion, we hope to provide our content to more educational publishers around the globe. We believe this partnership will open up more opportunities for both Knowledgemotion and Bridgeman in the future.”

David Bainbridge, CEO of Knowledgemotion, said: “Celebrating our first anniversary, we’re excited to have increased the number of content partnerships for our platform and to do that with world-class partners. Recently we have seen a growing demand for corporate learning videos as well as Humanities subjects in higher education. These new videos will help to satisfy that demand from our clients around the world and continue the journey where boclips.com will become the home for video in education.”

For further information contact

David Bainbridge, Knowledgemotion, +447801 180155 david@knowledgemotion.com

www.boclips.com

 

OIID!

”When the remix is better than the original”

(Excerpt from leading Norwegian business daily DN, written by music journalist Audun Vinger 29 April 2016, translated by Th Selvik)

…when Kanye West on February 14 in a subtile way informed that the album, “The Life Of Pablo” was not ready after all, this was a new key incident in the history of remixing. The day before the album was recorded, mixed and ready for digital launch, but West had a sudden feeling that a lot could be done differently with a central song on the album, “Wolves”. The song, co-produced by Norwegian, Casmere Cat, was quickly reorganized. The vocal tracks by Vic Mensa and Sia were deleted and replaced with lyrics by the brilliant Frank Ocean. The song was sequenced differently, and Kanye West thus remixed the song – before it was issued.

This depicts how there is a dynamic view on the album format, a format going through a revolutionary change. It also describes how a song is really never complete anymore. A month later West altered the album and put the song back on. Thus music becomes a soft lump of silicone,that can be shaped to some extent along the way, and not a creative truth carved in stone. And – as is the case in many other walks of life these days – increasingly the commercial power is shifted towards the customer and the public.  The recruitment to the upper echelons of pop music has lately been private people’s remixes of famous songs. These remixes have slowly grown to success on websites such as Soundcloud and othere places where new music is shared. Norwegian artist Kygo is one of these players. The way he interpreted and mixed a song like Ed Sheeran’s “I See Fire” and later Seinabo Sey’s “Younger” was instrumental in re-establishing the  tropical house genre and in launching the Kygo sound. He also helps make the original artists more popular than they would have been without his playing around in the metaphorical teenage bedroom.

A few days agi DN wrote about the international launch of the Norwegian app, oiid. Oiid will be presented in the United States this Saturday – and even to the Obamas in the White House as part of “International Jazz Day”. In its way oiid will bring thje remixing culture into people’s homes in a big way. Oiid consists of a tool set and a music format rendering it possible for the user to isolate each instrument and/or the vocal tracks of the song. Play drum and bass alone, or totally remove the vocals. In fact it feels like sitting by the soundboard and mixer and move the volume levers up and down for each track, in the same way producers and engineers for a long time have done in “The Making Of…” documentaries about classic pop albums. 

Resembling examples have for quite some time circulated online among music freaks. We could listen to isolated vocals of the wildest Beatles songs, thus portrayed in a complete new way, or the recent analysis of Toto’s “Rosanna, revealing how amazingly detailed the pop classic is constructed – instrument by instrument. This technology is really eye and ear opening. The scope and possibilities of the oiid, where the public will experience their favorite music in a complete new way, may soon turn into a dramatic new music format for music aficionados  – and others. And not least: The oiid  will mean a new way for record companies and artists to sell their music. For some of us this will mean the fourth of fifth time we buy the songs, a really attractive business for the sellers! Until noe the oiid is primarily meant to be a consumer product for play and entertainment – the mixes one constructs cannot be shared or resold, but it is of course only a question of time before these limitations are gone. Nonetheless the principle remains: the consumer are able to make their own mixes based on raw material from the master tapes. This implies that the next George Martin or Max Martin will be found just as likely among the public as among the established music stars. An open-minded approach regarding the future is that songs will be offered to consumers who on their part remix, where one of these mixes are accepted as the final cut.

Remixing has of course since long been established as a central element in modern music. 70ies disco music and ensuing electronically based genres, all stem from remix thinking where instruments, elements and parts of the song were radically changed to function optimally on the dance floors. The given structure with verse, chorus and melodic focus, was no longer as central.  One essential figure in the development of electronic dance music is the DJ and produces Larry Levan working in the Paradise Garage club in Manhattan.  His eclectic selection of music became a genre all to itself, and he offered tailor-made remixes for his audience. Instruments were isolated, dub effects added rendering some really original song constructions. Some of his central work as remixer and studio producer have just been issued on a double-CD, “Genius Of Time”. The name Larry Levan is remendered as fondly as the music he played and remixed.

KNOWLEDGEMOTION PARTNERS WITH SEVEN MORE CONTENT PROVIDERS FOR BOCLIPS.COM

New content partnerships expand the curriculum aligned video library to more than 1.85 million high quality videos available for streaming and download. Makes further moves into corporate learning.

LONDON

Knowledgemotion, the London based company behind the world’s largest library for video in education – boclips.com – has now added seven new video libraries, marking a move into the corporate learning space. The new content partners have also significantly increased the number of specialist subjects available for primary, secondary and tertiary levels (K20-Higher Ed).

These newest content partners include the Art and History licensing specialist Bridgeman Footage and the prestigious Nature Picture Library. New partner ShortCutsTV, offers Sociology and Psychology specifically for education. And for primary level, BulBul and KarisLearn have been added. The latter makes math concepts visible, accessible and usable.

Finally, to add to its collection of corporate learning videos, boclips.com now also offers bespoke videos from Sustainable Business Education and EL Consulting. Their content range addresses a broad range, such as how to have a difficult conversation at work to how to set up your business in a sustainable fashion.

Beatrice Okoro, Account Manager at Bridgeman comments: “High resolution contemporary and fine art works are brought to life by the interactive IkonoTV collection, exclusively represented by Bridgeman Footage. Through our cooperation with Knowledgemotion, we hope to provide our content to more educational publishers around the globe. We believe this partnership will open up more opportunities for both Knowledgemotion and Bridgeman in the future.”

David Bainbridge, CEO of Knowledgemotion, said: “Celebrating our first anniversary, we’re excited to have increased the number of content partnerships for our platform and to do that with world-class partners. Recently we have seen a growing demand for corporate learning videos as well as Humanities subjects in higher education. These new videos will help to satisfy that demand from our clients around the world and continue the journey where boclips.com will become the home for video in education.”

 

For further information contact

David Bainbridge, Knowledgemotion, +447801 180155 david@knowledgemotion.com

www.boclips.com

Notes to Editors

About Knowledgemotion and About bo:

Knowledgemotion, a London based educational technology start-up founded in 2013 has created a proprietary platform called bo. The bo platform is named after the tree that provided Buddha with the shade he needed as he tried to make sense of the world and under which he ultimately reached wisdom. bo enables education publishers and providers to find, license and use video clips that they then embed into their digital textbooks and services. Knowledgemotion has agreements with leading international content owners including Getty Images, Bloomberg, BBC Worldwide Learning, Associated Press Television News, Sports News TV, Global Image Works and British Movietone. These agreements give bo access to a high quality, rights-ready library of more than 1.75 million video clips, spanning all key stages, subjects and topics in the curriculum.  Initial customers include; Pearson, the Open University, Twig, Editions Belin, Bloomsbury’s Fairchild Books and Cappelen Damm.

 

The Educational Publishing Gap, OR Markets Unserved

Over the last 20 years, the major US higher educational publishers have abandoned publishing books and course-ware for any but the top 200 courses offered in higher ed.

That leaves around 4,000 regularly taught, standard courses for which there are few or no textbooks available (Source: Market Data Retrieval, a D&B Company). Most, if not all, of these courses are taught in 4 year programs, so set aside the Community College market for this article. Some of these abandoned courses typically enroll large numbers of students, very often 100+ at state universities, for instance. In fact, it may be safe to estimate that more than 40% of total FTE enrollments are represented by these courses.

To get a quick and visceral feel for how deliberately publishers (who now fashion themselves “learning companies” only) have abandoned this once profitable arena, go to their websites. The home pages, and pages layers deep, are devoted to services, electronic learning materials, and platforms, but you will find it less obvious to discover the product catalog for courses not in the top 200. This sort of roundabout site navigation to non-top 200 courses makes their priorities clear.

So, let’s go back in Mr. Peabody’s WayBack Machine to Prentice Hall circa 1992, where I worked at the time, to see just how much things have changed:

Prentice Hall prided itself on publishing for virtually every course taught at the undergraduate level in the US (and, for that matter, the world), and many graduate level courses. It was a mantra, and it was beaten into our heads as part of the “Prentice Hall Story”. (To help understand what are “Upper Level” courses, see Appendix below.).

There were many reasons why PH did this, but three stand out:

• Providing professors with good books for their upper division courses created good will with professors when the rep turned the conversation to talk about the largest enrollment courses (which most professors really didn’t relish talking about, because: a. “books are all the same for basic courses”; b. many to most professors are disinterested in what book is used in the basic courses, or—for that matter, teaching the basic courses; and, c. reps could, and did, eat up a lot of the professor’s time chasing the basic course adoption.)

The upper level courses were (and still are today) where professors’ passions lie, and where students tend to be more passionate about the material as well, and PH made it easy for them to find an authoritative book to use.

• Prentice Hall derived around 50% of its sales and a higher percentage of its profits from Upper Level courses (A, B, and C, see Appendix).

• There were little to no used books for these courses, so the revenue was evergreen.

It remains one of the mysteries of the universe why Prentice Hall (at that time named Simon & Schuster Education, then Pearson Education)—and its competitors– abandoned this market. I have heard all the justifications, but they do not hold water for me. However, this article is not about the merit of that decision, but to describe the large opportunity left in its wake.

Now, let’s go to one of the Big 3 educational publisher’s current website and look at text offerings in disciplines like the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Business, where the highest percentage of overall enrollments in the 4 year college and university market are found. Three things jump out:

• There are no books for A, B, and C courses;
• There are sometimes no books for AA courses (remember, an AA book was a book projected to sell over $250,000 per year in 1985!);
• For courses where there is a recently published book or electronic learning material, there is only one offering, reducing choice in the market.

Another way to view this is to go to a few university web sites and match courses to texts from this publisher. Going to the University of Texas and The Ohio State University sites, and then to the Psychology Dept courses, we find no book for over 60% of the courses for undergraduates for fall 2015. And looking at a small liberal arts college, as another data point, Holy Cross College, we find the same for 40% of their Psychology Dept courses (I eliminated any course that is a Seminar or Special Topics Course, leaving only standard offerings).

This leaves a vast terrain of courses for which there are no texts or hard to discover non-texts that might serve for these courses. The courses are still being taught; it’s just that almost no one is publishing for them.

Another facet of this opportunity is that many professors really want to write text books for these courses. Many are motivated to write a book, because they often say “I can’t find the right book for my course, so I’d like to write it”. Many want to contribute to the general welfare of learning in their discipline. Many welcome the extra, sometimes quite sizable income that comes—or used to come–from writing and publishing a text for an upper level course. So, there is a ready and eager pool of available talent out there to write books that are needed. Many have taken to self-publishing to fill this void, but their works are hard to find, as you would expect.

Someone should fill this gap, whether a start up or some other publishing company. Here are some reasons why:

• The market opportunity.
• The revenue associated with upper level textbooks is predictable and budgetable; each year more or less the same number of students take Course X in the US, and an entrant would likely have the only text available for over 90% of those offerings, I would estimate;
• There is an eager and ready talent pool that will welcome the opportunity to write texts again;
• It will bring good will to that entrant from institutions and professors, and from students as well—particularly if the entrant’s pricing strategy undermines current pricing strategies;
• These texts have been traditionally relatively easy to market, and would be especially so in our current search-dominated world;
• There is currently virtually no competition; it is Blue Ocean;
• And because these markets are global, the entrant can sell the English language versions to third parties for international distribution and sell Foreign Language Rights as well.
• It will be highly profitable: upper level texts were enjoying 40%+ net profit margins.

All of which leads to a stable and highly profitable business. A legacy business with upside. Who wants to seize this opportunity? It is there for the taking.

Appendix :

Prentice Hall had a long standing priority rating for identifying the importance of each new book published each year. I will use 1985 for the date to fix for this example:

• AAA: A book projected to sell at least $500,000 in Year 1
• AA: A book projected to sell at least $250,000 in Year 1
• A: A book projected to sell at least $100,000 in Year 1
• B: A book projected to sell at least $50,000 in Year 1
• C: A book projected to sell at least $25,000 in Year 1.

(A, B, and C courses were/are typically taught at the junior and senior level, although many could/are offered at the sophomore level.)

This was 1985, when the average text book sold for a list price of about $30, as against the $125-250 of today. Gee, conservatively a C book today would sell $100,000 in Year 1.


Timothy C. Moore
The Hatch Group and Milamber Ventures, PLC

VOICELESS CHILDREN: APRIL 21, 2016 6:30 – 8:00PM

VOICELESS CHILDREN:

THE CIVIL RIGHTS STRUGGLE THAT NEVER BEGAN

APRIL 21, 2016 6:30 – 8:00PM

TISHMAN AUDITORIUM, VANDERBILT HALL 40 WASHINGTON SQUARE SOUTH

Social Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century Speaker Series presents prominent social entrepreneurs and leaders from across the spectrum of public and professional sectors who will share their insights as cutting-edge, far reaching change-makers.

Personal privacy laws designed to protect children also serve to protect an $80 billion a year status quo.
As a result, a troubled system remains unfixed, leading to generational replication, 1,300 child deaths a year, a 3% college graduation rate, and over 50% ending up homeless, incarcerated or on welfare within two years of aging out.

What can we do to help change this?

RSVP at NYU.EDU/REYNOLDS
PETER SAMUELSON PRESIDENT, FIRST STAR ACADEMIES

SOLEDAD O’BRIEN CEO, STARFISH MEDIA GROUP

Click here for more details

NYU Samuelson_21 April 2016

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